Four Points Bulletin

Travels north, east, south, and west of our Oceanside home base.

Lake Charles is the halfway point between Houston (where we flew in) and Lafayette (where we are staying tonight). As beer drinkers, we are always curious about brewers’ rendition of beer when we are further from home. We were pleasantly surprised with Crying Eagle Brewery in Lake Charles. The beer, food, and facility was outstanding. …

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With the pandemic present we put a pause on airplane travel, but we are ready to press play again. For our summer trip through the south we decided to fly to Houston, placing us within two hours of Louisiana (the first southern state on our itinerary). A1 had a very memorable first flight. We spent …

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Alameda is a city within Alameda County, better known for its most populous city, Oakland. It is just a Park Street Bridge away from Oakland but it seems so much further. The bridge was built by workers of the Federal WPA program in 1935. Part of the celebration on opening day included a wedding of …

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Lake Merritt is a tidal lagoon, connected to San Fransisco Bay, formed 10,000 years ago. It is also North America’s oldest wildlife refuge, established less than two decades after Oakland became a city. Our destination today was found alongside the lagoon where, within the Gardens at Lake Merritt (within Lakeside Park), a free, volunteer run …

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History runs deep in the town of Yuma (known as Arizona City until 1873). For us, it is the half way point between Oceanside, CA and Cave Creek, AZ, and a favorite place to stretch our legs and get a meal. For Spanish soldiers and explorers, it was a stopping point after heading up the …

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Just about an hour north of Phoenix, near the turnoff for Prescott, exists an “urban laboratory”, Arcosanti. Arcosanti was dreamed up by Paolo Soleri, one of Frank Lloyd Wright’s many interns. Italian-born Soleri became quite well known for making bells, and the bell production continues to this day (long after his death), at multiple facilities. …

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Old Sacramento is a 28 acre National Historic Landmark and State Historic Park that features dozens of restored and recreated Gold Rush-era buildings. It is located right next to the Sacramento River, and includes a restored river paddle boat that is now a permanently moored hotel and restaurant. Old Sacramento is also the terminus of …

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Yreka (pronounced why-reeka) was incorporated in 1857, but miners began flocking to the area in 1851, after a gold miner discovered some gold in the area. The name origin of the town remains a mystery, but Mark Twain claims, “there was a bakeshop with a canvas sign which had not yet been put up but …

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The Pearl District in Portland used to be occupied by railroad classification yards and warehouses. Now it is home to eateries and fancy shops (and is considered one of the safest places in Portland). Portland has over 250 nationally registered historic places in the city, and Deschute’s Brewery is located inside one, the 1919 G. …

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